(no commit message)
[amrad.git] / projects.mdwn
1 # AMRAD Project Ideas
2
3 ><i>“In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are not.”</i>
4 >- anon.
5
6 <ul>
7 <li><strong>Microcontroller Applications</strong> <a href="/projects/sbc/">Microcontroller Applications</a> References,resources, project ideas, and progress reports for AMRAD member projects using the Arduino, Rasperberry Pi, BASIC Stamp and others.</li>
8
9 <li><strong>Low Frequency Operation</strong> <a href="/projects/lf/">LF: Low Frequency Operation</a> LF stands for Low Frequency, that portion of the RF spectrum extending from 30 through 300 kHz. In Europe, where there are numerous broadcast transmitters between 150 and 250 kHz, it is often called ``Long Wave''. Under ideal conditions in mid-winter the high power European broadcast transmitters can be heard on the U.S. East coast.</li>
10
11 <li><strong>Mainstreaming <a
12     href="/projects/ss/">spread
13     spectrum</a>.</strong> In 1998, ARRL petitioned the
14     FCC to liberalize the code sequences and include automatic power
15     control for powers above 1 watt. This petition may prove to be
16     controversial, as TAPR and other groups want to lower the SS
17     operating frequencies below 420 MHz--some as low as HF--yet
18     others feel SS should be banned. Bob Buaas and his group on the West
19     Coast continue to with their STA, which allows SS at 50 MHz and
20     higher. AMRAD members could join the STA and put some systems
21     on the air.</li>
22
23 <li><strong>Higher speed digital systems.</strong> This is one of
24     Terry's favorite saws. Where are the high speed packet modems and
25     radios? Dave Sumner questions why US hams are not doing more with
26     higher speeds; he cites S53MV's article in CQ ZRS on his 1.2288
27     Mbit/s 13-cm system.</li> 
28
29 <li><strong>Utilization of <a
30     href="http://www.amrad.org/projects/microwave/">microwave
31     bands</a>.</strong> Because of 
32     line-of-sight propagation in these bands, their popularization
33     requires an infrastructure or backbone. Otherwise, microwave and
34     millimetric frequencies will be used only for isolated short-range
35     links.  There was a remark that AMRAD may not be in a good
36     position to develop microwaves. That may be true and there are
37     several microwave clubs that may be better able to do
38     it. Nevertheless, there may be a role for AMRAD. We could lose
39     these bands unless we come up with 24-hour uses over wide
40     geographic areas occupying large portions of the bandwidth
41     allocated.</li> 
42
43 <li><strong>Developing an amateur beacon system capable of
44     contributing propagation data to the ITU.</strong> Amateurs have
45     an extensive array of beacons from HF through
46     microwaves. Unfortunately,their transmissions are received only on
47     a real-time basis and there is no attempt to automatically
48     receive, reduce and report the data to any scientific group such
49     as ITU-R Study Group 3 or URSI. IARU President Dick Baldwin has
50     recently reinstructed the IARU beacon working group to reorient
51     the beacon network into one that includes automatic reception and
52     reporting. The ITU has a transmit format that permits machine
53     reception. AMRAD could study that and recommend its adoption by
54     amateur beacons or come up with one that might be more suitable
55     for amateur use. We could also design any hardware and software
56     hams would need. Dick Barth showed interest in this project and
57     has asked me to supply him with the ITU documents so he can
58     prepare an article on the subject.</li> 
59
60 <li><strong>Designing <a
61     href="http://www.amrad.org/projects/dsp/">DSP/software
62     radios</a>.</strong> The time is right 
63     to do this. There are several guys at COMSAT Labs who are
64     interested in this project and should be willing to cooperate with
65     us.</li>
66
67 <li><strong>Application of wireless chip sets to amateur
68     systems.</strong> There are three generations of chip sets (5, 3
69     and now 1-volt) developed for cellular and other so-called
70     wireless applications. It could be a worthwhile project to gather
71     the specs, study them and decide how we could apply them to
72     Amateur Radio designs.</li> 
73
74 <li><strong>Experimenting with digital voice</strong> such as APCO
75     Project 25. TIA did a lot of work picking the most effective
76     digital voice technique for new public safety radios. The one they
77     selected may or may not be best for Amateur Radio. The FCC rules
78     already permit digital voice, even on the HF bands. </li>
79
80 <li><strong>Experiment with automatic link establishment
81     (ALE).</strong> There is now a Federal Standard. QST and QEX have
82     carried articles on this subject. We could either push for
83     adoption of this standard or develop our own.</li>
84
85 <li><strong>Design some tech toys.</strong> This could be a project
86     having no other goal than having fun.</li>
87 </ul>