(no commit message)
[amrad.git] / index.mdwn
index 9cc26b7..b2433ba 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,8 @@
 * August 8, 2013 - Maitland Bottoms, AA4HS, introduced us to digital voice communications on HF using  FreeDV software. FreeDV is an application for Windows, Linux and MacOS (BSD and Android are in development) that allows any SSB radio to be used for low bit rate digital voice.
 The software compresses speech to 1400 bit/s then modulates a 1.1 kHz wide quadrature phase-shift keying  (16-QPSK) signal which is sent to the Mic input of a SSB radio. On receive, the signal is received by the SSB radio, then demodulated and decoded by FreeDV. Communications is readable down to 2 dB S/N, and long-distance contacts are reported using 1-2 watts power.
 
 * August 8, 2013 - Maitland Bottoms, AA4HS, introduced us to digital voice communications on HF using  FreeDV software. FreeDV is an application for Windows, Linux and MacOS (BSD and Android are in development) that allows any SSB radio to be used for low bit rate digital voice.
 The software compresses speech to 1400 bit/s then modulates a 1.1 kHz wide quadrature phase-shift keying  (16-QPSK) signal which is sent to the Mic input of a SSB radio. On receive, the signal is received by the SSB radio, then demodulated and decoded by FreeDV. Communications is readable down to 2 dB S/N, and long-distance contacts are reported using 1-2 watts power.
 
-<blockquote>FreeDV is unique as it uses 100% Open Source Software, including the audio codec. FreeDV represents a path for 21st century Amateur Radio where Hams are free to experiment and innovate without being locked into a single manufacturer’s proprietary technology.
+<blockquote> 
+FreeDV is unique as it uses 100% Open Source Software, including the audio codec. FreeDV represents a path for 21st century Amateur Radio where Hams are free to experiment and innovate without being locked into a single manufacturer’s proprietary technology.
 
 The same cables and hardware that you use for other digital modes that are based on PC programs will work with FreeDV, but you will need a second sound interface for the microphone and speaker connections to the FreeDV program. A USB headset of the sort used by gamers is all you need for the second sound interface.</blockquote>
 
 
 The same cables and hardware that you use for other digital modes that are based on PC programs will work with FreeDV, but you will need a second sound interface for the microphone and speaker connections to the FreeDV program. A USB headset of the sort used by gamers is all you need for the second sound interface.</blockquote>
 
@@ -17,7 +18,8 @@ The same cables and hardware that you use for other digital modes that are based
 
 * June 13, 2013 AMRAD hosted a doubleheader for slow modes: DFCW and JT65. 
 
 
 * June 13, 2013 AMRAD hosted a doubleheader for slow modes: DFCW and JT65. 
 
-<blockquote>The first presentation was by André N4ICK titled <i>An Arduino-based DFCW Beacon for the 479 KHz Band.</i> André discussed Dual Frequency CW (DFCW) and updated us on the ARRL petition to the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology regarding the new band. He demonstrated his design of an Arduino-based 479kHz beacon, and expanded on the eventual possibility of "crossing the Pond" to communicate with British Hams who have been experimenting for a while with this new allocation.
+<blockquote>
+The first presentation was by André N4ICK titled <i>An Arduino-based DFCW Beacon for the 479 KHz Band.</i> André discussed Dual Frequency CW (DFCW) and updated us on the ARRL petition to the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology regarding the new band. He demonstrated his design of an Arduino-based 479kHz beacon, and expanded on the eventual possibility of "crossing the Pond" to communicate with British Hams who have been experimenting for a while with this new allocation.
 
 Dual Frequency CW, or DFCW, is a technique where a CW signal is transmitted at a very slow symbol rate, typically at 3 seconds per dot. This allows reception in very narrow bandwidths.
 
 
 Dual Frequency CW, or DFCW, is a technique where a CW signal is transmitted at a very slow symbol rate, typically at 3 seconds per dot. This allows reception in very narrow bandwidths.