added JT9 mode, fixed Andre's accent
[amrad.git] / projects / lf.mdwn
index 296f58e..688338e 100644 (file)
@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@ Many people use active antennas, while others prefer ferrite bars, or remotely t
      antenna design.</span></li>
  <li class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
      mso-list:l4 level1 lfo14;tab-stops:list .5in'><span style='font-size:13.5pt'>AMRAD
      antenna design.</span></li>
  <li class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
      mso-list:l4 level1 lfo14;tab-stops:list .5in'><span style='font-size:13.5pt'>AMRAD
-     member Andre' N4ICK has a nifty design that combines an E-Field probe and
+     member Andr&eacute; N4ICK has a nifty design that combines an E-Field probe and
      varactor tuned preamp to limit overload by strong stations. You can see
      his work here. <a href="lfpreamp.html">N4ICK LF preamp</a></span></li>
  <li class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
      varactor tuned preamp to limit overload by strong stations. You can see
      his work here. <a href="lfpreamp.html">N4ICK LF preamp</a></span></li>
  <li class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto;
@@ -229,7 +229,12 @@ DBF39.</a> (From <a href="mailto:spin@inrete.it">Marco Bruno - IK1ODO</a></span>
 href="jan2000\index.html">Nags Head NC</a></b><span style='font-size:13.5pt'>
 and some of the spectrograms we got there.</span> </p>
 
 href="jan2000\index.html">Nags Head NC</a></b><span style='font-size:13.5pt'>
 and some of the spectrograms we got there.</span> </p>
 
------
+##New JT9 Mode for MF and LF:
+
+If you are on 472 or 137 kHz, you may be interested in a new mode called JT9, designed especially for making QSOs on these bands. JT9 uses the structured messages introduced in 2003 for the JT65 mode, now widely used for EME and for QRP operations at HF. JT9 can operate at signal levels as low as -27 dB (in a 2500 Hz reference bandwidth), with one-minute timed transmissions. It also offers slower transmissions of 2, 5, 10 and 30 minutes duration, and the slowest mode can decode signals as weak as -40 dB. With one-minute transmissions, submode JT9-1 has a total bandwidth of 15.6 Hz -- less than one-tenth the bandwidth of a JT65A signal. The other submodes are narrower still: a JT9-30 signal occupies about 0.4 Hz total bandwidth.
+
+JT9 is implemented in an experimental version of WSJT called WSJT-X. Some further details can be found at
+<a href="http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjt.html"> http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjt.html</a>. The author, <a href="mailto:k1jt@arrl.net">Joe K1JT</a>, requests feedback with your experience with JT9. Please tell him you saw the link on the AMRAD website.
 
 <p><a name=DspIntregration></a><b><span style='font-size:18.0pt;font-family:
 Arial'>DSP INTEGRATION:</span></b> </p>
 
 <p><a name=DspIntregration></a><b><span style='font-size:18.0pt;font-family:
 Arial'>DSP INTEGRATION:</span></b> </p>