(no commit message)
[amrad.git] / projects / ss.mdwn
index 9e398aa..291b99d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
 <h1>Amateur Spread Spectrum</h1>
 
-Paul Rinaldo, w4ri@amrad.org<br>
-Hal Feinstein, wb3kdu@amrad.org<br>
-Andr&eacute; Kesteloot, n4ick@amrad.org<br>
+<p>Paul Rinaldo, w4ri@amrad.org</p>
+<p>Hal Feinstein, wb3kdu@amrad.org</p>
+<p>Andr&eacute; Kesteloot, n4ick@amrad.org</p>
 
 <P>
 The use of spread spectrum communications began in the Amateur Radio Service in
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ March 1981 when the FCC issued a Special Temporary Authority (STA) to AMRAD.
 W4RI and K2SZE made the premiere HF contact using frequency hopping. WA3ZXW, 
 N4EZV, WB5MMB and K8MMO were also involved in these early experiments. A joint 
 FCC-AMRAD 'fox hunt' demonstrated that spread spectrum stations could be located 
-with direction-finding techniques. N4ICK became involved later, beginning in 1986.
+with direction-finding techniques. N4ICK became involved later, beginning in 1986.</p>
 <P>
 At AMRAD's urging, in 1985 the FCC amended Part 97 of its Rules to permit regular 
 spread spectrum communications in the Amateur Radio Service with certain restrictions as 
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ MHz with unrestricted spreading codes. In 1996, the American Radio Relay League
 (ARRL) petitioned the FCC to permit other spreading sequences, require automatic power 
 control when transmitting at powers above 1 watt, while keeping the lowest operating 
 frequency at 420 MHz. The FCC has issued a Notice of Proposed Rule Making and is 
-expected to decide on rule changes during 1997-98. 
+expected to decide on rule changes during 1997-98. </p>
 
 <h2>What is Spread Spectrum?</h2>